406.4(D)(2) Non-Grounding-Type Receptacles.

When replacing a non-grounding type receptacle with a GFCI type, the receptacle or the cover plate must be marked “No equipment ground”.
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When replacing a non-grounding type receptacle with a GFCI type, the receptacle or the cover plate must be marked “No equipment ground”.

Code Change Summary: Revisions were made to the requirements for replacing non-grounding type receptacles.

Non-grounding type receptacles were used for many years on small branch circuits before rules appeared in the 2002 NEC requiring receptacles installed on 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits to be of the grounding type.

Many older electrical installations have receptacles supplied from branch circuits without an equipment grounding conductor. These installations were code compliant based on the NEC used at the time.

When replacing receptacles in one of the older installations where an equipment grounding conductor is not present in the device box, the NEC gives several options.

One of the methods permitted in 406.4(D)(2) is to replace a non-grounding type receptacle with a GFCI type receptacle. When doing this, the 2014 NEC required the “receptacle” to be marked “no equipment ground”.

In the 2017 NEC, the code language has changed to require receptacles “or their cover plates” to be marked “no equipment ground”. This should prove to be easier for the electrician since the cover plate provides a much larger surface to stick labels on.

Below is a preview of the NEC. See the actual NEC text at NFPA.ORG for the complete code section. Once there, click on their link to free access to the 2017 NEC edition of NFPA 70.

2014 Code Language:

406.4(D)(2) Non–Grounding-Type Receptacles. Where attachment to an equipment grounding conductor does not exist in the receptacle enclosure, the installation shall comply with (D)(2)(a), (D)(2)(b), or (D)(2)(c).

(a) A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with another non–grounding-type receptacle(s).

(b) A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with a ground-fault circuit interrupter-type of receptacle(s). These receptacles shall be marked “No Equipment Ground.” An equipment grounding conductor shall not be connected from the ground-fault circuit-interrupter- type receptacle to any outlet supplied from the ground-fault circuit-interrupter receptacle.

(c) A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with a grounding-type receptacle(s) where supplied through a ground-fault circuit interrupter. Grounding-type receptacles supplied through the ground-fault circuit interrupter shall be marked “GFCI Protected” and “No Equipment Ground.” An equipment grounding conductor shall not be connected between the grounding-type receptacles.

2017 Code Language:

406.4(D)(2) Non–Grounding-Type Receptacles. Where attachment to an equipment grounding conductor does not exist in the receptacle enclosure, the installation shall comply with (D)(2)(a), (D)(2)(b), or (D)(2)(c).

(a) A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with another non–grounding-type receptacle(s).

(b) A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with a ground-fault circuit interrupter-type of receptacle(s). These receptacles or their cover plates shall be marked “No Equipment Ground.” An equipment grounding conductor shall not be connected from the ground-fault circuit-interrupter-type receptacle to any outlet supplied from the ground-fault circuit-interrupter receptacle.

(c) A non–grounding-type receptacle(s) shall be permitted to be replaced with a grounding-type receptacle(s) where supplied through a ground-fault circuit interrupter. Where grounding-type receptacles are supplied through the ground-fault circuit interrupter, grounding-type receptacles or their cover plates shall be marked “GFCI Protected” and “No Equipment Ground,” visible after installation. An equipment grounding conductor shall not be connected between the grounding-type receptacles.

Informational Note No. 1: Some equipment or appliance manufacturers require that the branch circuit to the equipment or appliance includes an equipment grounding conductor.

Informational Note No. 2: See 250.114 for a list of a cord-and-plug- connected equipment or appliances that require an equipment grounding conductor.

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406.4(D)(2) Non-Grounding-Type Receptacles.

Below is a Real Question from our Electrical Continuing Education Courses for Electrical License Renewal:

Which of the following is true for a GFCI type receptacle installed to replace a non-grounding type receptacle in a box where an equipment grounding conductor does not exist?

A: The back of the receptacle must be marked “No Equipment Ground”.
B: The side of the receptacle must be marked “No Equipment Ground”.
C: The marking of the phrase “No Equipment Ground” must be done where the branch circuit originates.
D: An equipment grounding conductor shall not be connected from the ground-fault circuit-interrupter-type receptacle to any outlet supplied from the ground-fault circuit-interrupter receptacle.
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